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The Greek and the Roman Novel: Parallel Readings

Michael Paschalis, Stavros Frangoulidis, Stephen Harrison, Maaike Zimmerman (eds.)
 

Series: Ancient Narrative Supplementum 8

ISBN-13: 9789077922279

Publication year: 2007

Publication type: Book

Pages: XX, 307

Cover: Hardcover

Format: 175 x 245 x 24 mm; 770 g; b & w ill.

Price excl. VAT: 83.00

Price incl. VAT: 87.98

Ancient Narrative Supplementum 8 is the first volume to be dedicated entirely to parallel readings of the Greek and the Roman novel. As a rule, publications taking a comprehensive look at the ancient novel treat the Greek and the Roman novels independently of each other, or at most discuss standard thematic categories. It is intriguing that a sharp distinction between the Greek and the Latin novels should have ever existed and that it should be tacitly maintained at the present time. Of the three surviving Latin novels, Apuleius' Metamorphoses has a Greek model, Petronius' Satyrica bears distinct traces of Greekness, and the Historia Apollonii strongly resembles the Greek ideal novel, especially Xenophon's Ephesiaka. The discovery of new papyrus fragments of Greek fiction (Lollianos' Phoinikika, the Iolaos and the Tinouphis fragments) has shown that low-life, comic, and sensational features are not the exclusive province of the Latin novel. Recent chronological revisions have squeezed the dates of the earliest Greek novels into the period between 41 and 75 A. D., thus envisaging the "birth" of the Greek novel and that of the Roman Satyrica as contemporary or near-contemporary events. The need to re-examine the relations between the two main traditions of the ancient novel in the context of a unified Greco-Roman tradition emerges today as more urgent than ever. The portrayal on the cover page of this volume of Echo and Narcissus, of self-reflection and reduplication of sound, symbolizes a pictorial challenge to look at the dialectics of the Greek and the Latin novels and appreciate their intimate relationship.

The parallel readings of the present volume explore various issues in Greco-Roman fiction: political accommodation in coming-of-age novels, the language and practice of magic, narratives of failure, textual considerations and narrative meaning, hidden authors, proposals and criteria for dating, the access to knowledge, plot structures, religion and narrative, the fortunes of Athenian Hellenism, vision and narrative, attitudes towards Roman imperial rule, and the motif of the stolen cup.

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Contents

STEPHEN HARRISON AND MAAIKE ZIMMERMAN
Acknowledgements VII

MICHAEL PASCHALIS AND STAVROS FRANGOULIDIS IX
Introduction

1 GENERAL 1

JEAN ALVARES
The Coming of Age and Political Accommodation in the Greco-Roman Novels 3

GARETH SCHMELING
Narratives of Failure 23

CONSUELO RUIZ-MONTERO
Magic in the Ancient Novel 38

NIALL W. SLATER
Posthumous Parleys: Chatting Up the Dead in the Ancient Novels 57

MICHAEL PASCHALIS
The Greek and the Latin Alexander Romance: Comparative Readings 70

2 PETRONIUS AND OTHERS 103

JOHN MORGAN
Kleitophon and Encolpius: Achilleus Tatius as Hidden Author 105

EWEN BOWIE
Links Between Antonius Diogenes and Petronius 121

KEN DOWDEN
A Lengthy Sentence: Judging the Prolixity of the Novels 133

ANDREW LAIRD
The True Nature of the Satyricon? 151

3 APULEIUS AND OTHERS 169

ROMAIN BRETHES
Who Knows What? The Access to Knowledge in Ancient Novels: the Strange Cases of Chariton and Apuleius 171

STAVROS FRANGOULIDIS
Transforming the Genre: Apuleius' Metamorphoses 193

STEPHEN HARRISON
Parallel Cults? Religion and Narrative in Apuleius' Metamorphoses and Some Greek Novels 204

STEVEN D. SMITH
Wonders Beyond Athens: Reading the ‘Phaedra' Stories in Apuleius and Heliodoros 219

KIRK FREUDENBURG
Leering for the Plot: Visual Curiosity in Apuleius and Others 238

ELLEN FINKELPEARL
Apuleius, the Onos, and Rome 263

MAAIKE ZIMMERMAN
Aesop, the ‘Onos', The Golden Ass, and a Hidden Treasure 277

Abstracts 293

List of Contributors 299

Indices 302
Index locorum 302
General Index 304

Reviews

- A. Markantonatos, BMCR 2010.02.42. The full review can be found at http://www.bmcreview.org/2010/02/20100242.html.
- Françoise Létoublon, Phoenix (2010) 64, 176-178
- John Birchall, Scholia Reviews (2009) 18
- Stefan Tilg, Ordia Prima 7 (2008), 234-241
- Judith Hindermann, Museum Helveticum (2008) 65, 232
- Sarah Rey in Les Etudes Classiques (????) ??, pp. 269-270 

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